Jun 16, 2019  
2015-2016 Catalog 
    
2015-2016 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Instructional Information



ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Academic achievement is recognized for each major term for full- and part-time students through the following honors lists:

  1. President’s Honors List for students achieving a 4.0 grade-point average for the semester.
  2. Dean’s Honors List for students achieving a 3.5 to 3.99 grade-point average for the semester.

The student must complete at least 12 graded credit hours during the semester to receive an award certificate. Student registered for 6 to 11 graded credit hours will receive a letter of achievement.

Degree seeking students who complete with a 3.75 cumulative grade point average (or higher) will be identified as “Completed with Honors” on the official transcript.

ACADEMIC BANKRUPTCY

Academic bankruptcy permits the removal of up to two complete semesters’ grades from a student’s cumulative grade point average. Courses and grades taken in this academic period remain on the permanent record, grade point factors are removed and the credits will not count toward graduation. There are specific criteria that must be met to qualify for academic bankruptcy.

Qualifications:

  1. Obtain Application for Academic Bankruptcy from the campus Registration Office or online at www.cccneb.edu/AcademicBankruptcyApplication.  Questions about this process can be addressed by Registration Office staff.
  2. Complete at Central Community College 15 sequential credit hours with a term 2.5 GPA.  All grades from each term that the 15 sequential credits come from will be included in the GPA calculation.  Credits can be earned in multiple, sequential terms (i.e. Fall/Spring/Summer in sequence).  While Foundation grades will not factor into the term GPA, a Foundations course successfully completed with a grade of “C” or better will qualify toward the 15 credit hours. 
  3. Indicate term(s) to be removed from GPA.
  4. Complete and sign application form; obtain signatures.
  5. Return the form to the campus Registration Office.

Please note:

  • Once completed, the Academic Bankruptcy process cannot be reversed.
  • Term(s) with courses that have been applied to a previously earned CCC degree, diploma, or certificate cannot be bankrupted.
  • All courses, credit hours, and grades (not just those with a D or F) completed during the term(s) to be bankrupt will not count toward graduation or prerequisite requirements.
  • The term(s) to be bankrupt will remain on the transcript and will be marked “Approved for Academic Bankruptcy.”
  • A student receiving Veteran benefits may be required to pay back benefits received during the Academic Bankruptcy term(s).
  • A student may bankrupt up to two terms at CCC during his/her lifetime.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Central Community College (CCC) believes successful students are independent critical thinkers who possess the work ethic and skills necessary to make a positive difference in their professions and communities.  In order to maximize student and community success, CCC is devoted to maintaining an honest academic environment and upholding integrity as a core value.  All individuals across all course modalities are expected to practice academic integrity, which encompasses the fundamental values of honesty, trust, respect, fairness, and responsibility.  In the case of alleged violations of academic integrity, CCC strives for fair resolution.

Instances of Academic Dishonesty:

Behaviors that violate the fundamental values of academic integrity at Central Community College may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Plagiarism - direct copying or paraphrasing without citation someone else’s work (i.e. writing, images, video or audio)
  • Cheating - engaging in any behavior intended to achieve an unfair advantage for self or another in any academic exercise (i.e. unauthorized collaboration or unauthorized use of resources of data in a study)
  • Fabricating Information - inventing or falsifying information (i.e., making up resources and/or citations, falsifying academic records)
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty - soliciting, furnishing, or offering to furnish unauthorized exams, quizzes, or academic materials; participating in academic sabotage.

Procedures for Addressing Alleged Instances of Academic Dishonesty

  1. When an instructor believes a student may have committed academic dishonesty, the instructor will contact the student to discuss the situation (face-to-face, phone or electronic communication). Electronic meetings may be appropriate for distance students. Every effort will be made to resolve the situation between the instructor and the student.
  2. At the discretion of the instructor, resolution of academic dishonesty may include the following Academic Sanctions:
    a.  Revision and resubmission of assignment/project/paper within an identified time frame, potentially with a lowered grade;
    b.  No resubmission of the assignment/project/paper with an immediate zero;
    c.  An immediate zero for the test/quiz/examination.
  3. The instructor completes the Academic Integrity Action Form and submits it to the Division Dean of Instruction. The form may be referenced should the student be involved in additional alleged instances of academic dishonesty. (The Academic Integrity Action Form is available online http://www.cccneb.edu/AcademicIntegrity/.)
  4. In addition to instructor’s Academic Sanctions, a student involved in academic dishonesty also may be subject to College Sanctions recommended by the Division Dean of Instruction including probation, suspension or dismissal. See the Student Handbook for additional information.
  5. Incidents of academic dishonesty that occur independent of a particular assignment or course will be forwarded directly to the Division Dean of Instruction for review.  Resolution of incidences may include recommended or applied College Sanctions such as probation, suspension, or dismissal from college. See the Student Handbook for additional information.

Academic Integrity Appeal Process

  1. The student has the right to appeal an academic sanction applied by an instructor for academic dishonesty within 5 business days of the applied academic sanction.
  2. For incidents of academic dishonesty, the instructor will notify the student (face-to-face, phone or electronic communication) of the academic sanction applied.  Electronic meetings may be appropriate for distance students.
  3. The student has the right to appeal the academic sanction by requesting a meeting with the Division Associate Dean of Instruction within 5 business days of notification of the academic sanction by the instructor.    
  4. Should resolution not be reached, the student has the right to continue the appeal by submitting the Academic Integrity Action Form to the Division Dean of Instruction within 5 business days of the meeting with the Division Associate Dean of Instruction to request an appeal panel hearing.
  5. The Division Dean of Instruction may contact the student for additional information before convening and moderating a three-member Academic Appeal Panel.
  6. The student has the right to request a peer student serve as an appeal panel member.  If requested, the peer student will be selected by the Division Dean of Instruction.
  7. The student is responsible for providing electronic copies of supporting documents s/he plans to present during the appeal hearing to the Division Dean of Instruction 5 business days prior to the date of the appeal hearing.  The Division Dean of Instruction will forward documentation to the appeal panel members to review prior to the appeal hearing.  Should no documentation be provided, the hearing will proceed.
  8. The Academic Appeal Panel will convene to review the documentation, to hear student and instructor statements, and to make a recommendation for resolution to the Division Dean of Instruction.  In the case of a student’s or instructor’s absence, the hearing may proceed.
    1. The student and instructor will make separate statements before the appeal panel.
      1. The student is allowed a maximum of ten minutes to present his/her appeal, including review of any supporting documentation.
      2. The instructor is allowed a maximum of ten minutes to present circumstances of the situation.
    2. A supporting advocate may accompany the student to the hearing and will be introduced to the panel. The advocate will speak only if questioned by the panel.
    3. The appeal panel may ask clarifying questions.
  9. Following the hearing, the appeal panel will make a written recommendation to the Division Dean of Instruction within 3 business days.
  10. The Division Dean of Instruction will review the Academic Appeal Panel’s recommendation and finalize resolution of the appeal. All parties will be notified by the Division Dean of Instruction. Additional College Sanctions (probation, suspension, dismissal) may be recommended at this time.
  11. The student and/or instructor have the right to appeal the Division Dean of Instruction’s resolution.
    a.  The student and/or instructor may appeal Academic Sanctions by contacting the College Executive Vice President to request final consideration of the appeal within 5 business days of notification by the Division Dean of Instruction.
    b.  The student may appeal College Sanctions by Due Process Procedures (See the Student Handbook for additional information) within 10 business days of notification by the Division Dean of Instruction.

     
  12. The College Executive Vice President will review all relevant materials pertaining to the appeal. The decision of the College Executive Vice President regarding the resolution of academic appeal is final.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The college awards the Associate of Arts (AA) Degree and Associate of Science (AS) Degree to students completing academic transfer programs. Associate of applied science degrees, associate degrees in nursing, diplomas, and certificates are awarded in career and technical programs. To receive a degree or diploma a student must complete 25 percent of the semester hours of the program of study with Central Community College (CCC), with the exception of existing articulation agreements or program requirements.  Other exceptions must be presented to the appropriate college discipline dean for approval. To receive a certificate, a student must complete one-half the certificate requirements with CCC. A 2.0 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) is required to receive a degree, diploma, or certificate.

The college offers a pass/no pass grade option (see Grading). The number of “pass” graded credits that can be applied toward graduation is restricted to 12 credit hours toward degrees, 6 credit hours toward diplomas, and 3 credit hours toward certificates. Please note that “pass” credits may not be accepted for transfer by some four-year colleges and universities.

Students have five years to complete graduation requirements as outlined in the college catalog in use at the time of their first enrollment. However, the student may elect to substitute the requirements from any subsequent catalog during the five-year period of their enrollment. Students who do not complete program requirements within five years must meet the requirements from a catalog in effect within five years of the time of graduation. To graduate from CCC, students must submit an application to the record’s office at least eight weeks prior to the date they plan to complete their program of study. Graduation ceremonies are held in May at each campus.

DEGREES, DIPLOMAS, AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

All courses must carry a course number of 1000 or higher to be applied toward a degree, diploma, or certificate.

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degrees

The Associate of Arts (AA) and the Associate of Science (AS) Degrees provide a comprehensive education within the academic transfer program at CCC. For requirements for these degrees see Associate of Arts Degree  and Associate of Science Degree .

In addition, all graduates with a diploma or degree will meet the basic achievement requirements for math, writing, and reading. These requirements are located under the General Education Basic Achievement and Core Requirements Degree.

Associate of Applied Science Degree

The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree provides a comprehensive education in a specific occupation. Its main purpose is to prepare students to begin their career upon completion of the degree. Minimum requirements for an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree are 60 semester-hours of credit, including 15 credits in general education or equivalent competencies. However, many programs require more than 60 credits. See AAS and ADN General Education Groups  for more information.

Associate Degree in Nursing

For information regarding the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) see AAS and ADN General Education Groups .

Diploma

The diploma provides the basic skills needed to enter a career field. Minimum requirements for a diploma are 32 semester hours of credit, including nine credits in general education. Specific requirements vary for each program and are listed in the course of study for each program in this catalog.

Certificate

The certificate recognizes students who have acquired a specific occupational skill by completing at least 12 semester-hours of credit in a declared skill area. In any given certificate, only one course may be duplicated from any certificate awarded to an individual.

Award

The award recognizes achievement of competencies through programs requiring less than 12 semester-hours of study in a declared skill area.

Recognition of Attendance

A “Recognition of Attendance” certificate may be offered to students who complete non-credit courses.

CREDIT SYSTEM

Central Community College (CCC) awards credit on the semester-hour system. The terms “credit,” “credit-hour,” “hour of credit,” or “hour” are used interchangeably with the term “semester-hour.”

A credit hour is a unit measurement used to ascertain the educational value of course work offered by the institution to students enrolling in such course work, earned by such students upon successful completion of such course work, and for which tuition is charged. Credit/contact time ratio guidelines for semester (or quarter equivalents) are outlined in Nebraska state statute 85-1503.

Semester

Quarter

 

1:15

1:10

Classroom Hour

1:30

1:20

Academic Transfer, General Education & Academic Support Lab Hour

1:45

1:30

Vocational Laboratory & Clinical Hour

1:45

1:30

Practicum Hour

1:60

1:40

Cooperative Work Experience

 

 

Independent (directed) Study - Credits will be assigned according to the practices of assigning credits to similar courses.

In addition, the Federal Credit Hour Definition includes a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week per semester or quarter hour of credit. 34CFR 600.2 (11/1/2010)

GRADING

The student may select from several grading options at the time of registration, unless the course has been designated with a specific grade option.

  • Pass/No Pass: A letter grade is not issued and the course grade does not affect the student’s grade-point average. To receive a passing grade the student must complete the course with a “C” average or greater.
  • Standard Grade: Students receive standard grades used to establish their grade-point average.
  • Students not declaring a grading option will automatically use the standard grade option. Students electing a pass/fail or audit option must inform the college during registration.
  • With the exception of auditing, once a student has selected a grading option for a course, the student will be bound to that option after the free add/drop period.
  • Auditing Courses
    • Students desiring to attend a course without taking examinations or receiving credit for the course may register in an audit status. Students who register for an audit course will pay the regular educational costs and must declare to audit at the time of registration.
    • Students who wish to change from audit to credit or credit to audit after the course is underway, must have the permission of the instructor and must process the change through the records office within the first two weeks of classes.
    • Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits cannot count audited courses in determining course load.

GRADES/GRADE-POINT AVERAGE

To determine the grade-point average (GPA), divide the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credits for which a standard grade (A+, A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D, F) is awarded. Foundations classes (classes with less than a 1000 number) will not be counted toward college GPA. Grade-points are awarded on the following basis:

  A+ 4 grade-points per credit
  A 4 grade-points per credit
  B+ 3.5 grade-points per credit
  B 3 grade-points per credit
  C+ 2.5 grade-points per credit
  C 2 grade-points per credit
  D+ 1.5 grade-points per credit
  D 1 grade-point per credit
  F

No grade-point awarded (does not count toward graduation)
Grade reports also may reflect the following, which are not used to calculate GPA:

  I Incomplete (does apply in GPA calculation) (no grade point awarded, GPA will be recalculated upon completion of course with earned grade)
  X Audit (no credit or points)
  CR No Points, No Grade
  NC Non-Credit (no credits or points, no grade)
  NP No Pass (no credit or points)
  P Pass (credit awarded, no points awarded)
  W Withdraw or Drop (no credits or points, no grade)
  R Retake (the higher grade earned is used in calculating the GPA)

Grade reports also may reflect the following, which are used to calculate GPA. The following are definitions for grades:

A - Student demonstrates outstanding achievement by mastering course objectives
B - Student demonstrates commendable achievement in meeting course objectives
C - Student demonstrates acceptable achievement in meeting course objectives
D - Student demonstrates marginal achievement in meeting course objectives
F - Student fails to meet course objectives

INCOMPLETE GRADE

Students who are unable to complete all course competencies because of extenuating circumstances may request a status of ‘Incomplete’ after consulting with the instructor. The student consults with the instructor and completes a contract outlining the remaining work to be completed. Incomplete courses must be completed by the end of the following term, ie…fall/spring,  spring/fall, summer/fall. Time extensions may be approved by the campus dean for non-standard length-of-term courses, ie…Nursing Assistant, Paramedic. The contract must be approved by the instructor, and reviewed by the supervisor and campus dean. The contract for the Incomplete grade must be signed and submitted to the Registrar’s office by 5 p.m., the last day of the semester. Students may not drop a course for which they have negotiated a contract for an “incomplete”.  When the contract is completed, a change of grade form will be submitted.

Incomplete grades will be calculated as an ‘F’ in the student’s GPA until the contract is completed and the grade change form is submitted. If the contract is not completed by the date agreed upon, the ‘I’ will be changed to an ‘F.’

CHANGE OF GRADE

Change of grade forms will be used for circumstances other than those covered by an “incomplete” grade such as an incorrect calculation. The change of grade form will also be used to request a grade change for results of a grade appeal or the change of an ‘incomplete’ to a letter grade. Change of grade must be approved by the campus dean. Change of grade must be completed by the end of the semester following the semester in which the grade was earned.

GRADE APPEAL

A Grade Appeal may be initiated by a student under the following circumstances:

  1. the numerical calculation of the final course grade is disputed;
  2. the student believes that the final grade is not indicative of his/her academic performance.
  • The student is responsible for initiating contact with the instructor to discuss and resolve the grade dispute (face-to-face, phone or electronic communication).  Electronic meetings may be appropriate for distance students.
  • The student must contact the instructor no later than November 1st or April 1st of the following term in which the final grade was assigned.
  • Should resolution not be reached between the student and instructor, the student has the right to appeal.  See the Grade Appeal Process below.
  • If the instructor is no longer employed by the institution, the student contacts the Division Associate Dean of Instruction.
  • A student who has questions about this policy should contact any Associate Dean of Students.

Grade Appeal Process

  1. The student is responsible for initiating contact with the instructor to discuss and resolve the grade dispute (face-to-face, phone or electronic communication). Electronic meetings may be appropriate for distance students.  Every effort will be made to resolve the situation between the instructor and the student.
  2. Should a resolution not be reached between the student and instructor, the student has the right to appeal to the Division Associate Dean of Instruction within 5 business days of last contact with the instructor.
  3. Should a resolution not be reached, the student has the right to continue the appeal by submitting the Grade Appeal Action Form to the Division Dean of Instruction within 5 business days of the meeting with the Division Associate Dean of Instruction to request an appeal panel hearing. (The Grade Appeal Action Form is available online http://www.cccneb.edu/GradeAppeal/.)
  4. The Division Dean of Instruction may contact the student for additional information before convening and moderating a three-member Academic Appeal Panel.
  5. The student has the right to request a peer student serve as an appeal panel member.  If requested, the peer student will be selected by the Division Dean of Instruction.
  6. The student is responsible for providing electronic copies of supporting documents s/he plans to present during the appeal hearing to the Division Dean of Instruction 5 business days prior to the date of the appeal hearing.  The Division Dean of Instruction will forward documentation to the appeal panel members to review prior to the appeal hearing.  Should no documentation be provided, the hearing will proceed. 
  7. The Academic Appeal Panel will convene to review documentation, to hear student and instructor statements, and to make a recommendation for resolution to the Division Dean of Instruction.  In the case of a student’s or instructor’s absence, the hearing may proceed.
    1. The student and instructor will make statements before the appeal panel.
      1. The student is allowed a maximum of ten minutes to present his/her appeal, including review of any supporting documentation.
      2. The instructor is allowed a maximum of ten minutes to present circumstances of the situation.
    2. A supporting advocate may accompany the student to the hearing and will be introduced to the panel.  The advocate will speak only if questioned by the panel.
    3. The appeal panel may ask clarifying questions.
  8. Following the hearing, the appeal panel will make a written recommendation to the Division Dean of Instruction within 3 business days.
  9. The Division Dean of Instruction will review the Academic Appeal Panel’s recommendation and finalize resolution of the appeal. The Division Dean of Instruction will initiate any Grade Change Form with Registrar.  All parties will be notified by the Division Dean of Instruction.
  10. The student and/or instructor have the right to appeal the Division Dean of Instruction’s resolution.
    1. The student and/or instructor may appeal by contacting the College Executive Vice President to request final consideration of the appeal within 5 business days of notification by the Division Dean of Instruction.
  11. The College Executive Vice President will review all relevant materials pertaining to the appeal.  The decision of the College Executive Vice President regarding the resolution of grade appeal is final.

STANDARDS OF PROGRESS

Academic Standards

To encourage satisfactory progress throughout the student’s course of study, the college’s academic standard policy establishes specific criteria to be met by all students enrolled in credit courses.

The goal of the college is for every student to experience academic success. Therefore, the college may provide special support for students experiencing difficulty in meeting the academic standard.  Assessment of academic skills, completion of foundations course work, modifications in course schedules, and/or development and participation in academic improvement plans are examples of intervention strategies which the college may employ to assist students experiencing academic difficulty.

A 2.0 cumulative grade-point average (GPA) is required to receive a degree, diploma, or certificate from Central Community College (CCC). Therefore, a semester/cumulative GPA below 2.0 is cause for concern in regards to the academic progress of a student. Students who earn a semester GPA below 2.0 will receive an academic progress alert letter from the campus dean of educational services encouraging them to improve their progress and performance.

Academic Probation

A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be subject to academic probation. The dean of educational services will determine the academic probation and issue a notice to the student. If the GPA requirement is not met upon the completion of the subsequent semester, the student may be subject to academic suspension. Students in the nursing or health programs who do not meet the progression policies as outlined in the Health or Nursing Student Handbook will also be subject to academic probation. The dean of health occupations will determine the academic probation and issue a notice to health occupation students.

Academic Suspension and Reinstatement

The campus president has the authority to suspend a student from the college who fails to meet the conditions of his or her academic probation agreement. The campus president, after appropriate due process, can authorize suspension of students for a period not to exceed 16 weeks. Students may not attend classes during the suspension. Students can request (in writing) reinstatement by the campus president at the end of their suspension. Upon reinstatement, students are placed on probation for up to 16 weeks for evaluation.

Academic Dismissal

Students who do not successfully complete the probation agreement initiated at the end of the suspension will be subject to academic dismissal from a specific program or the college. The campus president authorizes academic dismissal.

Academic Status Appeal

A student may appeal academic probation, academic suspension, or dismissal. The appeal must be in written form and forwarded to the office of the campus president.

Program Standards

In addition to the academic standard, individual programs may have other requirements such as attendance and progress rates which students are required to meet in order to remain in “good academic standing” in their program. Students not meeting these academic standards will be subject to academic probation.

RESIDENCE HALL STANDARDS OF PROGRESS

To be eligible to live in the residence halls, a residence hall student must maintain “Residence Hall Standards of Progress”. The Residence Hall Standards of Progress are the same as the Financial Aid Standards of Progress.  Information on the Financial Aid Standards of Academic Progress may be found in the Student Services Offices, Programs and Activities . Students may be considered for re-admittance to the residence halls by making a request, in writing, to the chief housing official. When students are re-admitted into the residence hall, they will remain on residence hall probation until Residence Hall Standards of Progress are met, or until eligibility is discontinued.

TRANSFER

Inter-Campus Transfer

Credits earned through CCC programs are accepted at all campuses of the college. Disciplinary and academic probations issued by any campus will be honored by the other two campuses.

Transfer of Credit from another College

A person who wants to transfer credits from another college must have official transcripts of his/her entire college record sent directly to the records office. Only courses that are similar in content will be applied toward a Central Community College (CCC) degree, diploma, or certificate. The college will determine which courses are applicable to the student’s program of study. A grade of “C” or better is required in order for CCC to accept a course for transfer.

Nebraska Transfer Initiative

The Nebraska Transfer Initiative is a cooperative effort by Nebraska’s public and private higher education institutions to facilitate the transfer of credits between institutions. The core of this initiative is a common general education cluster of courses which are presented at cccneb.edu/transfer. The remainder of credit hours required for any transfer degree should be selected by the student in consultation with a transfer advisor and the institution to which they are transferring.

In addition to the articulated courses, the initiative assures any student who has successfully completed the courses identified in the articulated Associate of Arts general education core curriculum with an equivalent of a “C” (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or higher, and is admitted in-transfer to a participating institution will be:

  1. Granted standing comparable to current students who have completed the same number of equivalent credit courses toward an associate/baccalaureate-level degree; and
  2. Able to progress toward an associate/baccalaureate degree completion at a rate comparable to that of students who entered the associate/baccalaureate institution as first-time freshmen.

In all cases the college advises the student to consider specific transfer institution requirements. Please contact a transfer advisor at the institution to which you are transferring.

Transfer of Credits to Other Colleges

Central Community College (CCC) maintains transfer agreements with a number of colleges. CCC has formal transfer agreements with several institutions. Some agreements are for general education courses and others are for specific major or programs of study. If a student is interested in transferring CCC credits to another institution, go to www.cccneb.edu/transfer for additional information.

REVERSE TRANSFER INITIATIVE

Reverse transfer is the process of awarding an associate degree to a student who begins their education at Central Community College (CCC) and then transfers to a four-year institution prior to completing their associate degree. While at the four-year institution, students work towards their bachelor degree requirements and may transfer their coursework back to CCC to complete their associate degree requirements. Coursework counts at both the four-year institution and CCC. There is no fee involved for this service. A student needs to have completed 25% of the degree requirements at CCC and have a 2.0 GPA to be eligible. To learn more contact your advisor prior to transferring or call the Reverse Transfer Specialist on the Grand Island Campus to see if you qualify. 

HIGH SCHOOL ARTICULATION (Tech Prep)

Tech Prep is an articulation program with high schools and Central Community College (CCC). Tech Prep focuses on articulated classes between high schools and CCC that align skill sets for students to have a seamless entry into CCC technical or allied health programs. As of this writing, CCC has Tech Prep Agreements with 73 high schools: Adams Central, Alma, Amherst, Arapahoe, Arcadia, Aurora, Bertrand, Blue Hill, Boone Central, Bruning-Davenport, Cambridge, Central City, Central Valley (Greeley-Wolbach-North Loup Scotia), Centura, Clarkson, Columbus, Cozad, Cross  County, David City, David City Aquinas, Doniphan-Trumbull, East Butler, Elba, Elm Creek, Elwood, Eustis-Farnam, Fillmore Central, Franklin, Fullerton, Gibbon, Giltner, Grand Island Central Catholic, Grand Island Northwest, Grand Island Senior High, Harvard, Hastings, Hastings St. Cecilia, High Plains, Holdrege, Humphrey, Kearney, Kenesaw, Lakeview, Lawrence-Nelson, Leigh, Lexington, Lindsay Holy Family, Loomis, Loup City, Minden, Ord, Osceola, Overton, Palmer, Pleasanton, Randolph, Ravenna, Red Cloud, Rising City, Riverside (Cedar Rapids and Spalding), Sandy Creek, Sargent, Schuyler, Scotus Central Catholic, Shelby, Shelton, Silver Lake, St. Edward, St. Paul, Superior, Sutton, Twin River, Wilcox-Hildreth, and Wood River. High school students interested in participating in a Tech Prep program should contact their high school tech prep coordinator.

CREDIT OPTIONS

The college may grant/recognize credit for the written demonstration of the Advanced Placement, Standard Examination, Credit by Program Examination/Prior Learning and/or Military Service. Information on the amount of credit granted is listed in the Graduation Requirements section of the catalog.

  1. Advanced Placement - An admitted or currently enrolled student may benefit from advanced placement and college credit on the basis of scores on the College Entrance Examination Board tests. Students who earn grades of 3, 4, or 5 may receive credit for corresponding college courses, which are most nearly equivalent to the test, as approved by the Executive Vice President and officially reported to the Records Office. No additional charge by CCC.
  2. Standardized Examination - The student must complete a College Level Examination Program (CLEP) test with an acceptable score from a subject examination applicable to his/her program of study. Test fees are paid by the student and are regulated by the CLEP test corporation. No additional charge by CCC.
  3. Credit by Program Examination/Prior Learning - Students may earn credit for certain courses by Program Examination or Prior Learning.
 

a.  Credit by Program Examination - The program/campus associate dean will work with the program faculty in arranging a test-out time. The grade received on the test will determine if Credit by Examination will be awarded.

b.  Credit for Prior Learning - The student’s advisor will work with the program/campus associate dean in completing the required forms and documentation. For students requesting a course prerequisite be waived using Credit for Prior Learning, the prerequisite course instructor will work with the program/campus associate dean in completing the required forms and documentation.

c.  Courses completed through Credit by Program Examination/Prior Learning do not count toward financial aid credit hour eligibility requirements.

d. Students cannot receive Credit for Prior Learning for early college courses taken in high school (such as courses from a career academy) after the fact. Students must enroll for college credit at the time they complete the course.

e. Students cannot pay retroactively for early college classes taken in high school and receive credit (see e. above).

  1. Military Service Credit-CCC may award credit for successful completion of study through formal service schools and courses either through active duty, National Guard, or reserve education. Credit awarded for military service training is granted on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. Documentation of prior military service is required.  A maximum of three semester credit hours is awarded for Basic Training upon receipt of the DD-214 form (military separation papers). Additional semester credit hours may be awarded for military education as recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide.

CCC participates in the Concurrent Admission Program (ConAP) and is a member of the Service-members Opportunity Colleges (SOC).  Contact the Admissions or Records Office at a CCC campus for further information.

LEARNING RESOURCES

Books, computers and various types of audiovisual materials are available to all students. These materials are located in each program area or in a central resource center.

EXTENDED LEARNING SERVICES

Extended Learning Services (ELS) is an instructional support service designed primarily for the delivery of educational services, workshops, courses, and programs to students, businesses, industries, institutions, agencies, and the professions. These services will include, but not be limited to: (1) credit/noncredit courses, (2) avocational/recreational courses, and (3) adult basic education. ELS provides learning opportunities in a number of different programs, including Adult Education, Business and Professional Continuing Education and Training, Community Education, Distance Learning/Off-Campus Learning Centers, and Health Education and Training.

Adult Education

Adult Education (AE) is a program offered by Central Community College (CCC) in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Education and the Federal government. The program is designed to provide the opportunity to gain basic education skills at minimal cost to the student. The student must be 16 years of age or older and not enrolled in high school. The student is required to pay a nominal fee for General Educational Development (GED) tests and for the diploma.

The AE program has three major components.

  1. Adult Basic Education (ABE) classes for those students with skills below the eighth grade.
  2. English as a Second Language (ESL) classes for those students whose first language is not English.
  3. General Educational Development classes for those students with less than a high school diploma or home-schooled students.

Upon successful completion of the GED tests, the student is awarded a high school diploma by the Nebraska Department of Education. For information about these classes, contact the extended learning services office at the campus or off-campus center nearest you.

Central Nebraska Career Academy Project

The Central Nebraska Career Academy Project (CNCAP) is designed to provide high school juniors and seniors with opportunities to explore various career clusters.  Participation in CNCAP will provide students with college level courses while still in high school giving them a head start in high-demand career areas.  Students not only participate in college level course work but also are encouraged to participate in job shadowing events, college visits, industry tours, CNCAP sponsored luncheons and other CNCAP sponsored events that give students insight to the world of work.  At the printing of this catalog, there are three career academies for students to choose from: Business, Health Science, and Agribusiness. Future academies are being considered based on the changing needs of society.

Community Education

The Community Education program, which includes credit, non-credit reimbursable, and non-credit avocational/recreational courses, offers students an opportunity to explore and develop skills for job improvement, personal interest, leisure, and recreational activities. The courses in the Community Education program are offered, in many instances, as a response to requests from individuals or from advisory committees to meet community needs. Many of these courses are customized and are short-term in duration, usually lasting from one to four sessions. Non-credit reimbursable and avocational/recreational courses are not recognized for credit and do not fulfill any credit program requirements. No degrees, diplomas, and/or certificates are awarded by CCC for enrollment in vocational/recreational courses. A minimum number of participants are required for Community Education courses to be held.

Distance Learning, Off-Campus Learning Centers, and Early College

Central Community College (CCC) offers credit courses at off-campus learning centers and high schools in more than 90 communities throughout the twenty-five county service area. Many of these courses are offered in a variety of delivery formats, both electronically (web-based and telecommunications) and print-based. Distance learning responds to the growing need of working adults in central Nebraska to have access to certificate, diploma, and degree programs, as well as high school students wanting to earn college credits before graduation. Distance learning uses the same curriculum and standards as the program offered on CCC’s three campuses. Several state-of-the-art teaching technologies are used in the program. Technologies utilized include the Internet with instructor-paced and student-paced courses, interactive video systems, and individualized instruction.

Health Education and Training

Central Community College (CCC) offers training programs and courses for several health care occupations. These educational opportunities are available for adults seeking to become health care providers, needing to upgrade their skills, or those required to maintain their professional licensure through continuing education. The Columbus, Grand Island, and Hastings campuses, as well as the Lexington Center, are all approved by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services as training agencies  for Emergency Medical Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, Nursing Assistant, and Medication Aide.  The Grand Island Extended Learning Services office provides advanced level EMS training, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician and Paramedic.  In addition, CCC is approved by the American Heart Association as a Basic Life Support training center, offering classes in CPR, AED, and First Aid. Through a collaborative effort with the Nebraska Nursing Association, Extended Learning Services provides peer reviewed continuing nursing education.

Training and Development

Central Community College (CCC) is a primary source of training and education for business, industry, associations, civic groups, governmental agencies, and other organizations within its twenty-five county service area. College staff provide expertise in their fields of study to develop and coordinate specially tailored short courses, workshops, and seminars to meet specific training needs in areas such as leadership development, customer service, computer software, industrial maintenance, safety, welding, process improvement, weatherization, and Six Sigma. Additional information is available by contacting the director of training and development or the extended learning services office at any CCC campus or center.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Cooperative/Internship Education

Students participating in the cooperative/internship education program earn college credit for cooperative/internship experience related to their major area of study. Cooperative/internships are arranged jointly by the college, the student, and the employer. Grades and credits earned are based on the number of hours worked and success in achieving learning objectives. Students can participate in a cooperative/internship at the same time they are taking classes or they can work full-time for a one-semester cooperative/internship.

Additional information is available from the cooperative/internship education coordinator or faculty advisor on each campus.

Foundations Education

Foundations education is the foundation-building phase of the educational process. Foundations education courses are offered at all campuses to help under-prepared students develop reading, writing, mathematics and study skills necessary to be successful in college courses.

An assessment test is administered to determine if there is a need for foundations education courses. Appropriate general education courses may also be recommended. (See Assessment Services ).

Courses numbered less than 1000 do not apply toward a degree, diploma or certificate.  Students must pass foundations education courses with a “C” or higher to continue on to the next level class.  Foundations education courses are not counted toward a student’s college GPA.

Foundations education courses available at Central Community College (CCC) include:

Midwest Student Exchange Program

Persons from states participating in the Midwest Student Exchange Program (MSEP) in Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Wisconsin, can enroll at Central Community College (CCC) with discounted tuition. Also, CCC students and graduates who transfer to participating institutions in the MSEP will also receive tuition discounts if they qualify.

For more information about how to apply for admission under the MSEP or to find out what colleges and universities participate in the program, contact the admissions director at any CCC campus or check the website: http://www.mhec.org.

Real Estate, Insurance and Investments

Real estate courses provide the fundamental knowledge needed for employment in real estate. Real estate courses are offered in lecture form only, to comply with the Nebraska Real Estate Commission requirements. The real estate courses are listed under the business administration program. Insurance courses provide fundamental knowledge needed for persons interested in sales or administrative functions of the insurance industry. Courses in life, health, and property and casualty insurance are offered as needed and meet continuing education requirements of the Nebraska Department of Insurance. Courses are available for those who wish to attain the Chartered Life Underwriter and/or Chartered Financial Consultant designations.

Small Business Centers

Campus Small Business Centers offer workshops to meet the needs of entrepreneurs and small business owners. Topics are those identified as being needed or useful to specific situations and business conditions. Most workshops are short term; however, depending on local needs, longer term sessions may be offered.